1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
Dismiss Notice
Welcome to the Preppers Forum, registration is free and only takes a minute and allows you to join in with the discussions.

Please click here to register.

Bugging Out. Reading The Signs & Understanding Animals.

Discussion in 'Retreat Living' started by Keith, Nov 29, 2016.

  1. Keith

    Keith Active Member

    Messages:
    387
    Likes Received:
    163
    Trophy Points:
    43
    As a woodsman I have lived almost my entire life in the country, & as such I have learned to understand the language of the local wildlife. Understanding what the animals are telling you is important if you want to survive post shtf, you have to sleep sometime, you can not always be on your guard. Probably the most well known bird for giving alarm in the UK is the Blackbird. Of course if you are not known yourself in the area, this bird will also give your presence away!
    I have had a lot of contact with wildlife, both in the UK & here in Australia. I wrote a story about one such contact with a Raven which happened some years ago. I thought some of you may find it interesting.
    Keith.

    The Raven. © Keith H. Burgess.

    The raven was perched in a low dead tree up ahead. My dog was running here there and everywhere following the multitude of scents that were all about. The paddock was empty of sheep now, but it was not the sheep scent that Noir followed, she was trained to ignore sheep. No these were the scents of roo, fox, perhaps dog and rabbit and hare.

    The raven was still in the dead tree but appeared to be alert. Noir ran in that direction but she did not look up and see the raven but the raven was watching her. The trail I followed ran through bracken but as I approached the dead tree the trail widened as the bracken fell back to expose grass. Suddenly the raven took flight, but toward me instead of away from me. I kept walking but the raven flew straight at me and then turned and dived toward me again. But this was not an attack; it was more like a warning. It continued to flap in front of me appearing to do some sort of aerobatics directly in front of me and then suddenly something caught my eye, a large snake crossing my path just a little ahead. As soon as the snake had crossed my path and disappeared into the bracken on the other side the raven broke off its gyrations and returned to the tree. My dog came bounding over obviously on the scent of the snake and I called her to heel.

    As I got to the tree I stopped not far away and said “thank you” to the raven and it took off calling loudly.
     
    Phil likes this.
  2. lonewolf

    lonewolf Site Manager Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,421
    Likes Received:
    913
    Trophy Points:
    113
    we often see animal tracks on our daily walks, mostly badger and deer, we have seen several deer in the early morning.
    saw an old dog fox one morning in the summer. geese fly overhead. plenty of pheasant and wood pigeon in this area, wife feeds the wood pigeons-several of them come into the garden-one is getting quite fat on it.
     
    Keith likes this.
  3. Prime

    Prime Active Member

    Messages:
    450
    Likes Received:
    171
    Trophy Points:
    43
    The Alarm calls from Birds is a useful tool - I've completed several Tracking Courses and was introduced to listening in and learning about how the surrounding Birds can give an indication and notification of activity in a sector.

    There is a really good book upon it but currently the name escaped me - as soon as I remember ill post the name and details.

    Domesticated Geese btw Make EXCELLENT guard dogs - and dual use.
     
    Keith likes this.
  4. lonewolf

    lonewolf Site Manager Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,421
    Likes Received:
    913
    Trophy Points:
    113
    not just birds, squirrels and other game will soon alert us to any threats.
     
    Keith likes this.
  5. Prime

    Prime Active Member

    Messages:
    450
    Likes Received:
    171
    Trophy Points:
    43
    But Birds will be the best source and most accurate as its a warning call sounded out from a typically superior ( higher ) position and a more shrill note to other avian species.
     
    Keith likes this.
  6. lonewolf

    lonewolf Site Manager Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,421
    Likes Received:
    913
    Trophy Points:
    113
    maybe, depends how many are around at the time, birds around here come and go, they are here at one time but have gone somewhere else at another time, we have to use everything at our disposal not just one thing and one thing only.
     
    Keith likes this.
  7. Phil

    Phil Member

    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    8
    I find it fascinating to sit quietly and watch both nature and domestic animals and birds,they can all alert us to the goings on within the area.
    Cattle and horses can often be seen all (or mostly) looking in the same direction,this attraction is very often man and not the local fox.Sheep seek high ground if alarmed, it means someone has disturbed them,but possibly a dog,but whose?
    My favourite is the woody,they give warning if people are about,knowing your local woods will help you understand what is happening.
     
  8. lonewolf

    lonewolf Site Manager Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,421
    Likes Received:
    913
    Trophy Points:
    113
    i like searching for tracks in the mud and trying to identify the animal responsible.