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Food Drying For Preserving.

Discussion in 'Food & Water' started by Keith, Sep 17, 2017.

  1. Keith

    Keith Moderator Staff Member

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    [​IMG]
    All foods can be dried, vegetables & meat & all vegetables can be dried, even brassicas. You can dry foods in the sun, or over a fire or in the open oven of a wood fired stove.
    [​IMG] Pumpkin sliced & placed on oven trays ready for drying.
    [​IMG] Apple sliced & placed on racks for drying on top of our wood fired stove, & in the open oven.
    [​IMG] Using office filing draws for drying foods over the top of our wood fired stove.
    [​IMG] Sliced apple on a rack over a wood fired heater during winter.
    [​IMG] Potato sliced thin & dried looking like potato chips.
    [​IMG] Roasted pumpkin seeds for a tasty snack keep for ages.
    [​IMG] Corn strung on strings in the house for drying on the cob.
    [​IMG] Parched corn, dried corn & popped corn, all make excellent trail foods.
    Keith.
     
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  2. James

    James New Member

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    Impressive assortment. I've got a lot to learn.
     
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  3. Prime

    Prime Well-Known Member

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    I'm officially in love with your Oven Keith..... Glorious!!!!
     
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  4. Harry Palmer

    Harry Palmer Active Member

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    Nice Keith, although some of the food looks to be over dried, more cooked than dehydrated. You'll get better results from the consistent temperatures provided by electric driers and use you oven for emergency backup IMHO.
     
  5. lonewolf

    lonewolf Administrator Staff Member

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    if we ever moved on from here to a bigger place we want an ESSE stove.
     
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  6. swamp rat

    swamp rat Active Member

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    that is great Keith , I have to learn more about this suff
     
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  7. ystranc

    ystranc Well-Known Member

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    That reminds me, there's a guy down the road stripping out a Rayburn, I must ask him if he wants me to "get rid of it for him";)
     
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  8. Maria Spencer

    Maria Spencer New Member

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    I love this stove. We have a vintage AGA but its unpredictable.
    As for drying food. We do quite a bit (nothing like what you're doing) because we sail and travel off the beaten track to places where fresh food isn't always obtainable.

    I like the tip about corn.
     
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  9. Rhona Ann Oliver

    Rhona Ann Oliver New Member

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    great tips but what can ou do if you only have electric cooker
     
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  10. lonewolf

    lonewolf Administrator Staff Member

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    use a lower heat setting, the idea is to dry it not cook it.
    I've heard of people using their airing cupboards.
     
  11. ystranc

    ystranc Well-Known Member

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    Set the bottom element of the oven on lowest setting, usually 50 degrees C and leave the door ajar as though you were using the grill. Ventilation and indirect heat are key to getting it right.
     
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  12. Rhona Ann Oliver

    Rhona Ann Oliver New Member

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    thank you Ystranc i am trying to get as much together as pos and drying food is a great idea
     
  13. ystranc

    ystranc Well-Known Member

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    I use the lower Rayburn oven.
     
  14. Harry Palmer

    Harry Palmer Active Member

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  15. Rhona Ann Oliver

    Rhona Ann Oliver New Member

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    thank you harry that will save time and electric
     
  16. Harry Palmer

    Harry Palmer Active Member

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    Most of these smaller driers work out at @5p an hour to run, so all you need next is a vacuum sealer.
     
  17. Rhona Ann Oliver

    Rhona Ann Oliver New Member

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    thank you harry ou have been great goodnight
     
  18. Keith

    Keith Moderator Staff Member

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    Well if it was me, I would not use the electricity to dry foods, UNLESS I already had the stove on for some other purpose. If you have the stove on for cooking, you could find a way to dry foods from the heat already being created. If you do not have warming racks below or above, then perhaps you could make up some simple racks to somehow attach or hook over the top of the stove. Think out of the box.
    Keith.
     
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