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Foraging. Not Just Food.

Discussion in 'Post SHTF' started by Keith, Jul 29, 2017.

  1. Keith

    Keith Active Member

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    When you are in the woods or anywhere else in the country you need to pay attention to your surroundings & what lies on the ground. Foraging is a part of daily life, whether you are checking the trap line, fetching water or hunting. Food of course is important, so you will be keeping your eyes open for edible plants, but food is not the only thing to be looking for.

    Take note of animal sign, digging, tracks & scat. This will tell you what wildlife is in that area. A lot of bird droppings in one place is a tell tale sign of a regular roost above.

    Cattail plants are a source of food, shelter materials, arrow shafts & tinder for fire lighting. Siliceous rocks such as flint, agate & quartz etc are good for flint & steel fire lighting as well as knapping for gun flints. Rivers & creeks can often produce whetstones & honing stones for sharpening blades.

    Feathers can be used for arrow fletching, vent quills & pan brush. Animal bones make good arrow & spear points as well as tool handles.

    Don't forget to keep an eye open for plant & fungi tinders, these will be in constant use for lighting fires.
    Keith.
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  2. lonewolf

    lonewolf administrator and forum manager. Staff Member

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    exactly Keith, living in a rural area we are forever seeing animal tracks mostly deer, badger and dogs in our case.
    with feathers you need to collect ones from the same wing otherwise your arrow wont fly right, you can usually tell this by the way the feathers lie.
    we don't live in a flint area so animal bones are our best bet, hazel and ash are the best woods in my area for arrow shafts.
    most people just walk around and don't notice these things, the local saying is "they walk around with Sh#t in their eyes!".
     
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  3. Harry Palmer

    Harry Palmer Member

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    Sadly, we live in a 'throw away' society. I read somewhere that 20,000 tents were left behind at the Glastonbury Festival!!!

    I went on a ham radio camp to a small commercial site, spotlessly clean yet I noticed six or seven BBQ's just dumped by the waste bins...easier to dump them and buy another for £20. Also dumped were pots and pans, foam mattresses, sleeping bags :(

    Sad sign of the times.
     
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  4. lonewolf

    lonewolf administrator and forum manager. Staff Member

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    not just Glastonbury, pretty much every music festival this happens.
    step granddaughter(19) buys a cheap tent to go to a festival, then leaves it behind because she cant be bothered to pack it away, then buys another new tent for the next festival!!!:evilstare: and she's not the only one.
    we live in very wasteful times, the waste tips are overflowing but still the rubbish keeps piling up. I was brought up in a different era, people kept stuff "for a rainy day", there was always something you found "that'll come in handy"!!, different generation, they didn't dump stuff at the side of the road or lob it out of a car window, this was the time of "keep Britain tidy" and "take your rubbish home with you", now you cant go anywhere without falling over heaps of litter and fly tipping.
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2017
  5. ystranc

    ystranc Active Member

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    After the shit hits the fan all this waste could turned to your advantage...tent rods make great arrow shafts, the lines and canvas/nylon can always be used. Plastic bottles and cans are easy to make into traps. Bits of wire, overhead cable, phone lines etc......
    All this crap can be re used if we just think outside the box a little.
     
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  6. lonewolf

    lonewolf administrator and forum manager. Staff Member

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    SOME of this crap can be used post SHTF, I think there is a limit to the amount that we can use.
    bottles can be used in the garden on stakes to frighten away birds from your seeds, the larger water bottles can be used as mini greenhouses, tyres are always useful, any wood/timber is always a bonus.
    those tents could be used as extra accommodation, I wouldn't mind getting my hands on one of the tipi's that we saw abandoned at Worthy Farm many years ago- bad year- heavy rain.
     
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  7. ystranc

    ystranc Active Member

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    Plastic bottles also make good crayfish or bait traps for fishing...you can even carry water in them ;)
     
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  8. Prime

    Prime Active Member

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    You just need to look too or visit any Third World Country to have your eyes opened to the myriad of possible upcycling opportunities for ubiquitous items.
     
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  9. lonewolf

    lonewolf administrator and forum manager. Staff Member

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    yeah but who wants to live on a landfill site like most seem to do in the third world, or drink dirty water like most of the adverts for clean water providers would have us believe.
     
  10. lonewolf

    lonewolf administrator and forum manager. Staff Member

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    still I don't live in a third world country.........yet, i'm more concerned with conditions here and how they might affect my survival prospects.
     
  11. Prime

    Prime Active Member

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    LW ,
    You really do say the most inane things on occasion.

    You think that their existence is a choice.
    Amazing.

    Think I'll take some time away from this forum. The Moderator needs moderating.
     
  12. lonewolf

    lonewolf administrator and forum manager. Staff Member

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    i'm not saying their existence is a choice, we both know is more a case of where they were born.
    there is nothing I or you can do about their predicament, apart from maybe contribute a few pounds towards some project or other, well you can if you so wish, I was always taught "charity begins at home", this forum is dedicated to helping BRITISH preppers in formulating their plans, other preppers living in other countries are welcome to participate but its predominately a UK forum hence the name of the forum.
    by the way my title is Site Manager!!:thumbsup:
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2017
  13. Prime

    Prime Active Member

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    Well Maybe you are missing the point that we here in the UK as preppers can learn from people making usable items from Junk and Rubbish in some backwater Third World Flea Pit Country.

    Thats the lesson to take away , and you can learn it as long as you keep an open mind.
     
  14. lonewolf

    lonewolf administrator and forum manager. Staff Member

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    the trouble with relying on stuff that might be left lying about after any SHTF is relevant to the number of persons that survived, the stuff could all be used up or maybe its simply that someone else got there first!!
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2017
  15. ystranc

    ystranc Active Member

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    Or simply that those who came before didn't have the ability to think outside the box or the necessary skills to make use of the waste left behind by society.
    Just look at the ingenuity of some of the American pioneer art where they made fantastic and useful objects from old cans, wire and a bit of lead. It's better by far then modern purpose made products
     
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  16. Keith

    Keith Active Member

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    Wine bladders from casks of wine make great water containers. Take them out of the cardboard box. Good for home or travel. Light & strong. Would sooner use one I had than one I got from elsewhere.
    Keith.
     
  17. ystranc

    ystranc Active Member

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    There you go...I just knew Keith would be commenting on Australia's range of quality wines to suit any pallet or budget sooner or later;).
    A few years out there and everyone morphs into a wine salesman:rofl::rofl::rofl:
     
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  18. lonewolf

    lonewolf administrator and forum manager. Staff Member

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    maybe, but post shtf even the waste material is finite, there is only so much of it, when its gone its gone.
    at the moment I believe a lot of our recycling waste is shipped off to places like India and China.
     
  19. lonewolf

    lonewolf administrator and forum manager. Staff Member

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    the trouble is that most of our waste these days is plastic and there are only so many uses for plastic.
    plastic bottles can be used to carry water or any other liquid, the small ones can be put on stakes to keep birds off new plants, the larger ones cut the bottom off and use as mini greenhouses.
    but a lot of plastic has only one use and that's what it was designed for.
    tyres are always useful, as plant containers, growing spuds in or as a windbreak wall.
    pallets are always welcome, I have seen videos of houses built out of pallets.
    but unless one goes onto landfill sites-not recommended too many toxic fumes, its going to be what is left behind post event that which hasn't been collected and that could be just absolute refuse and litter, depending on where one is of course, the cities will have more waste, but staying around where mountains of filth have accumulated might be very hazardous to ones health.
     
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  20. Keith

    Keith Active Member

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    That reminds me, we are out of wine! Had a heap of wines left to us after Mother-in-law past away, but it is all gone now :(
    Keith.