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Home Buying (from A Preppers Point Of View).

Discussion in 'Security' started by lonewolf, Jul 27, 2017.

  1. lonewolf

    lonewolf administrator and forum manager. Staff Member

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    Many preppers at some point will chose to move home for one reason or another, this gives them a chance to make some lifestyle changes. you don't need to buy a 5 bed farmhouse next to a river to improve your chances like some seem to think.
    most people can not afford the "ideal" place, its always a compromise of costs, work, schools, transport etc. but if you consider some of the following tips and even achieve just one of them you will improve your survival chances.
    don't go for a property that is on a main road, or is likely to be used as a shortcut to a main road- so called "rat runs".
    avoid where possible the large dormitory estates that are springing up all over the country.
    Don't buy property near substations, telephone exchanges, TA centres, motorway junctions, railway facilities, hospital, industrial or retail units or shopping malls(the local shops are OK), supermarkets or hypermarkets, filling stations(the explosion risk is to dire to make this even remotely viable)basically anywhere that will attract refugees/police/ military attention during a crisis.
    try to find a property that is non descript, out of view from the main roads, shielded from prying eyes by hedges or high walls/fences. make sure its not prone to flooding.
    older properties are better than modern ones as they have more useful facilities such as cellars, lofts, outhouses, workshops, old but still useable wells, larger gardens.
    can the property take a wood fired range or an Aga type cooker in the kitchen? does it have functioning chimney and flues so a wood or coal fireplace could be fitted if necessary?
    the best properties have south west facing gardens to get the most sunlight, can you add solar panels or a wind turbine? perhaps space for a big greenhouse or a polytunnel?
    can you get your vehicle off road and out of sight? can you load/unload without your neighbours seeing what your up to?
    if all else fails and you end up with a 3 bed semi that relies on mains electricity you need to insure it is fully insulated, you need to obtain a portable gas heater and a minimum of 2 x 13KG gas bottles(1 in the heater and 1 spare), a camping stove and spare fuel for it, maybe a camping toilet for when the mains water shuts down and some form of non mains lighting.
    you could consider a portable generator but they tend to be very noisy and will only last as long as the stocks of fuel you have for it so a short term thing only.
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2017
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  2. ystranc

    ystranc Active Member

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    Rather then the usual wind turbines that you see popping up all over the landscape I would also reccomend looking at vertical axis turbines. While they're less efficient they can be built at home using basic skills and won't get the planning departments knickers in an uproar. I have seen them made from oil drums and angle iron mounted on an old trailer chassis. Painted with Matt paint to blend in.
     
  3. lonewolf

    lonewolf administrator and forum manager. Staff Member

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    you used to be able to get a "domestic" wind turbine from places like B&Q, what you didn't use fed into the national grid, not sure if there still available.
     
  4. ystranc

    ystranc Active Member

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    I think some of the cheaper ones from DIY stores had issues with vibration/noise transmitting to the house structure. There are still some available through boat chandlers though. 12v and expensive but tough and lightweight
     
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  5. Marwood

    Marwood Active Member

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    Some very handy tips there lone wolf... Great stuff:).. Makes a lot of sense
     
  6. Alanm

    Alanm Member

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    Ha ha! LW you pretty much described my house.I wish it was detached, but its paid for! I have the huge garden,polytunnels, well and wood burners. Just got to sort off grid power.
     
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