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Prepping And Politics.

Discussion in 'Conspiracy Theories' started by lonewolf, Nov 23, 2016.

  1. lonewolf

    lonewolf Administrator Staff Member

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    exactly ystranc, its not a case of if, its a case of WHEN, which is why I prep.
     
  2. Maria Spencer

    Maria Spencer New Member

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    DSC_6230.JPG DSC_1566.JPG DSC_6202.JPG DSC_6622.JPG DSC_1623.JPG
    Thanks. These are older pictures of her. She's now painted maroon red but there are no recent pics of her on my computer (I'll get some off my partner) She's a ferro cement, long keeled 50ft Bruce Roberts Ketch. She's an old jalopy of a boat but but she's steady and withstands tough sea's. She was built by a guy called George Weatherstone in Woodbridge in Suffolk with the intentions of doing the Antarctic but sadly he died shortly after she was finished.
     
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  3. ystranc

    ystranc Well-Known Member

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    I used to know an old guy called George from Woodbridge, his wife and daughter were horse mad. Unfortunately his daughter died.......same guy? He was a scientist/meteorologist.
     
  4. lonewolf

    lonewolf Administrator Staff Member

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    ever heard of Morgan-Giles vessels, boatyard in Teignmouth Devon, early 1900s to the 1960s, very sought after craft even today.
    built and designed by my wife's grandfather.
     
  5. Barbara

    Barbara Member

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    Oh Oh Oh what a lovely boat. We owned a much smaller one some years ago but sold it when the babies became mobile as l was scared they'd go overboard when we were distracted. (That's despite them wearing life jackets and being attached to the boat with bungees). The babies have long since reached adulthood but sailing is no longer part of our life. Something for retirement?
     
  6. mark wilson

    mark wilson Moderator Staff Member

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    Nice boat :thumbsup:
     
  7. lonewolf

    lonewolf Administrator Staff Member

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    nice boat but its a bit of a lump, not small.
    not that I know much about boats, I leave that to the wife-she's the family archivist, i'm a landlubber.:lol:
     
  8. lonewolf

    lonewolf Administrator Staff Member

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    back to prepping and politics.
    our world is now massively overpopulated and totally dependent on a smooth and continued technology infrastructure.
    this infrastructure is both incredibly complex and VERY fragile.
    the only way that even the population of this country can be fed is by huge imports of food from both Europe and the other side of the world, in a national or worldwide catastrophe these imports would cease.
    I don't think this country has ever been self sufficient in food, certainly not since before the Romans invaded in the 1st century AD. even then the Brits of the time were importing stuff from the known world so probably not even then.
    when I was a kid we grew stuff that was "in season", I doubt if many people these days have even heard of the term much less know what it means.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2017
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  9. Brownbear

    Brownbear Active Member

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    I am not sure our world is overpopulated as a whole. It is certainly overpopulated in some areas, but there are vast populable areas that are scarcely populated at all for political, financial reasons.

    I suspect the same exists for Britain being self sufficient in food. We exported food during Roman times. We also exported food from Ireland during the potato blight famine while huge numbers of Irish people starved. Again, I feel that financial and political reasons were the underlying cause.

    If one looks to WW2 and the import of foodstuffs, I suspect that food availability was reduced due to labour shortages and a reduction in food movement. One should also be mindful that there were huge numbers of overseas troops stationed in the UK in the build up to D Day who were non productive to the economy but still needed food and provisioning. I am also given to thinking that rationing was a propaganda tool more than a necessity.
     
  10. lonewolf

    lonewolf Administrator Staff Member

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    i disagree, running the food convoys into Britain was a dangerous job and many Merchant Sailors were killed in the Atlantic convoys, something that wasn't recognised for many many years afterwards.
    D day was much later in the war (1944)- we had already had 5 years of war, we had a lot of shortages up to that point, but I think a lot of the food rationing was caused to the civilian population because the fighting men came first.
    that's why the Germans had E boats, they were trying to shut down the food imports( not just food but materials too) and starve us into submission.
    my parents went through the war, dad in the army and mum was a nurse. so I have heard some of this first hand.
    I don't think rationing would work these days, most people wouldn't stand for it, there would be rioting in the shops.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2017
  11. Brownbear

    Brownbear Active Member

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    We're thinking along the same lines - yes I was thinking about later in the war, but as you say prioritising fighting men would have come first. A shortage of land workers as much of the male population was mobilised and less movement of foodstuffs would not have helped.

    A lot of convoy traffic was fuel, munitions and war materials, more so I believe than food - but I may be wrong on this.
     
  12. lonewolf

    lonewolf Administrator Staff Member

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    i think a lot of it was oil tankers but I could be wrong, some of it was food.
     
  13. Brownbear

    Brownbear Active Member

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    I might have a dig into it on the web to see (out of curiosity), if I get anywhere with it I'll let you know m8
     
    lonewolf likes this.