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Quick Home Gardan

Discussion in 'Food & Water' started by swamp rat, Aug 12, 2017.

  1. swamp rat

    swamp rat New Member

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    Here are some ideas for someone who wants to start a garden quick with everyday veg
    or store seeds for a shtf prep
    please add to the list



    RADISHES
    One of the fastest growing vegetables are radishes.
    Most varieties will be ready for harvest in just 25 to 30 days after planting

    GREEN ONIONS
    While it can take 6 months for onion bulbs to mature,
    the green onion stalks can be harvested after just 3 or 4 weeks

    LETTUCE
    Leaf lettuce such as Romaine can begin to be harvested about 30 days after planting.
    Cut the leaves once they reach at least 3 inches.

    BABY CARROTS
    Baby carrots can be harvested after about 30 days.
    Other carrot varieties may take between 50 and 80 days to mature

    PEAS
    Snow peas take only about 10 days to germinate and are ready for harvest in about 60 days

    BUSH BEANS
    Most varieties of bush beans are ready to harvest within 40 to 65 days from planting.

    KALE & OTHER LEAFY GREENS
    Kale, mustard greens and watercress are just a few delicious, super healthy greens that are fast growers.
    Most take about 50 to 65 days to mature, but baby leaves can be picked as early as 25 days

    TURNIPS
    Turnip roots are ready for harvest after about 60 days,
    however the highly edible leaves can be harvested in only 40 days.


    SQUASH
    Many varieties of squash, including zucchini, are usually ready after about 70 days.
    For best flavor, harvest squash when they are still small

    CUCUMBER
    Most varieties of cucumbers can be harvested about 50 to 70 days after planting
     
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  2. mark wilson

    mark wilson Well-Known Member

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    Nice post mate :thumbsup:

    A haven't got much to add.....at the moment we have strawberries....we are putting in some raised beds and a green house
     
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  3. ystranc

    ystranc Active Member

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    Apples, pears, plums, quince, greengage, figs grapes, damsons and kiwi fruit give a huge return for very little effort.
     
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  4. Keith

    Keith Active Member

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    We are extending the main house gardens this season. Extra squash, cucumbers & corn. I put in double gates to the upper garden yesterday so we can get a truck in there. Putting in another wide gate to get the tractor into the lower garden. I think growing your own food should be a priority, not just as prepping, but to reduce shopping costs & for your own health.
    Keith.
     
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  5. Alanm

    Alanm Member

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    That's the way to go.My orchard and perennial garden gives a massive yield with very little pest damage and zero work.

    However,for a beginner or someone with limited space swamp rats post is brilliant.
     
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  6. swamp rat

    swamp rat New Member

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    thanks Alanm yea it is for beginners, I myself have a big Polly tunnel and apple trees and a plot for potatoes
    just thought it would be a good idea to give people who don't grow an idea on how long things take to grow
    next project is to work out a growing calendar to grow all year round
     
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  7. Prime

    Prime Active Member

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    This is exactly the 'sweet spot' of prepping i've been harping on about for a bit.

    At this sweet spot its not about paranoid prepping ( perspective i know..) but a meeting place of why it all makes great sense!! it can be about food provenance , food benefits , money saving , physical health , etc etc
     
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  8. Alanm

    Alanm Member

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    Precisely! Could not put that better myself.
     
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  9. Prime

    Prime Active Member

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    Thank You - I've referred to a more user friendly 'prepping' as the " Good Life with Guns " - I think that kinda sums it up in the way I do it at least
     
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  10. lonewolf

    lonewolf administrator and forum manager. Staff Member

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    what we might refer to as smallholding or allotmenting, most of prepping and survival isn't about guns and violence, its about how to put food on the table in an emergency, when the system breaks down, either temporarily or permanent.
     
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  11. Alanm

    Alanm Member

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    Quite right. I am not a fan of Americanisms ( is that a word?) but I quite like their term 'Homesteading', and our own'Urban Farming'.Whatever the name, it sums up my own place. I have just got back from fishing, and after a cup of tea I will be getting tomatoes in the dehydrator, more beans in the freezer and the goats mucked out. It's a lovely way of life.
     
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  12. lonewolf

    lonewolf administrator and forum manager. Staff Member

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    not all of us have acres of land, I certainly don't although we have the largest garden in the area its still quite small, but its surprising what one can do with raised beds and containers, even a flat dweller with a balcony should be able to grow something in a container or a grow bag.
    and even animals don't have to be big, a couple of chickens would give enough eggs for most people and other poultry or rabbits have been kept in very small spaces, even in WW2 a lot of city dwellers had rabbits and hens in their back yards to supplement the ration cards.
    foraging if one knows what to look for is another way of supplementing ones diet, and yes fishing if near the coast or a decent sized river is another way.
     
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  13. lonewolf

    lonewolf administrator and forum manager. Staff Member

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    nobody here grows anything until the last frost has been and gone, its all to do with the temperature of the soil, cold soil grows nothing. the first thing to be grown around here every year is Broad Beans.
     
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  14. Alanm

    Alanm Member

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    Oh,we don't have acres of ground!We use all space intensively and well.We have a large garden,true,but its run on a loose permaculture system.We have our small orchard of fruit trees and bushes ,2 nannies and kids, rabbits and fowls,polytunnel and greenhouse, raised beds, workshop and patio area.All the way up the left hand side is a continuous log pile.All this in an area of about 2500 square feet.Oh yes,we have a well too.
     
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  15. lonewolf

    lonewolf administrator and forum manager. Staff Member

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    i don't mean that you had acres, just saying most people don't!:D
    especially anyone that lives in a city, I grew up in the suburbs and dad grew a lot, but not all, of our veg in the back garden, he composted a lot and had a lean to greenhouse where he grew lots and lots of tomatoes, I remember going in there as a kid and the smell of ripening tomatoes was a smell all of its own!!
    he also grew roses!!
     
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  16. mark wilson

    mark wilson Well-Known Member

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    A have a reasonably large back garden....we have been putting it of for a couple of years now but next year we have plans for a green house raised beds large buckets for spuds and such.
     
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  17. Barbara

    Barbara New Member

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    Can't add much to the list but for beginner gardeners out there, it's not only peas and beans that you can grow vertically, squashes also do well climbing, rather than scrambling over the ground although if you grow pumpkins, you will have to support the fruits.
    Don't forget to learn how to store the food you grow aswell. It's easy to turn surplus fruit into jam while sugar is available at the supermarket but explore bottling, drying, salting, smoking and any other methods our forebears used before the advent of refrigeration and freezing.
     
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  18. ystranc

    ystranc Active Member

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    Deliberately exposing a batch of cider to fruit flys can create a large amount of apple cider vinegar for preserving. Honey is a good desiccant, as is brine. Both salt and honey desiccated meats will cold smoke over hardwood chips.
     
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  19. Keith

    Keith Active Member

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    All vegies can be dried, as can all meats (wild boar & bear being the exception due to the possibility of TB infection).
    Keith.
     
  20. ystranc

    ystranc Active Member

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    Boar makes damn good sausages though :D
     
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