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The Shock & Horror!

Discussion in 'Country Living' started by Keith, Jan 3, 2017.

  1. Keith

    Keith Active Member

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    [​IMG]
    My wife reminded me this morning of some Japanese exchange students who visited here some years ago. They were staying with a school teacher in the city & via my sons asked if she could bring these students out to experience the bush. Their first shock & horror was seeing the animal skulls that myself & my sons had posted on tree stumps & tree limbs alongside our dirt track to the house. After that though they were appalled at the number of bugs & creepy crawlies around the place. Flys sent them into fits, as did bees. It makes me wonder just how many city people would react like this if they were driven out of the city.
    Keith.
     
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  2. lonewolf

    lonewolf Site Manager Staff Member

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    that's if they got that far, there seems to be this attitude that "all that animal muck, we might get a disease!!".
     
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  3. Brownbear

    Brownbear Active Member

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    Please guys remember that 90% of farm workers live in, and commute from, the towns thanks to rich folks buying up the country housing stock. Many in the city are country folk forced there for work, so let's not be too derisive of those that live in towns and cities.
     
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  4. lonewolf

    lonewolf Site Manager Staff Member

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    not around here they don't. farm work dosent pay that well and its hard work.
    farms in this area are either one man bands/family farms(like my wife's chiropodist!!) or they hire in Eastern Europeans, i cant say for other area's, may be in other areas city folk do farm work(they didn't when i lived in Plymouth) but usually city work is better paid than farm work...and shorter hours too!
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2017
  5. Prime

    Prime Active Member

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    Completely agree - Not everyone WANTS to live in a town / city so maybe it would be a good idea for the few for some people here to drop the 'Townies = Negative' divide that seems to be underlined by a few.
     
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  6. Keith

    Keith Active Member

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    I was not rubbishing the city folk, I was simply very surprised to see that sort of reaction & wondered how many people might be affected in the same manner.
    These people were from Japan, so they were seeing a whole different environment I daresay, but then we are for ever hearing about city people knowing nothing about how food is produced. Farming here may be different from the UK & the USA.
    Keith.
     
  7. lonewolf

    lonewolf Site Manager Staff Member

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    not that much different Keith, most people that live in cities if not large towns have the city attitude when it comes to the countryside and farming, most have no clue where their food comes from, nor do they care, as long as it in the supermarket when they want it. some may drive through the countryside and call it "quaint" and "cute" but most have no concept of the work it takes to get it looking like that, they just think it is. the amount of times-even on prepper forums- I have tried to explain how nature grows and how quickly stuff will become overgrown post collapse without people to manage it, but to no avail.
    most people would not want to be a farmer, 12 hour days are normal and 7 days a week, in the summer 14 and 15 hour days are not unusual for some. I think the average age for a farmer is around 60 and many are still working in their 80s.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2017
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  8. Prime

    Prime Active Member

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    You know the veracity of this statement how? How many people from the city have you personally interviewed?

    I do find these blanket personal statements and opinions a bit blinkered to be honest and seemingly intend to want to pass them off as fact - which they are not.

    I'm not a Town / City person myself , never have been and never really intend to. However seemingly wishing to want to dislike town people by such blanket remarks simply because they are Town or city people seems to offer no objective purpose at all.

    It would be much alike me suggesting all Country folk are backwater inbred's with a lack of education or civility.
     
  9. Keith

    Keith Active Member

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    I suppose one does tend to assume that everyone in the city is the same as the ones you have had contact with. This of course would not be the case, some city folk I am sure know where their towel is, but I do get the impression from news reports, blogs, forums, & other people, that there are a lot of people in the cities that have very little knowledge of what goes on in the country.
    Take for instance the pollution of our country environment over here, farmers committing suicide, mining companies ruining farm land. If there was a majority complaining about this, it would stop, but this is not happening & the majority over here live in the cities. So, for myself I get the impression that city folk simply bury their heads in the sand, & don't give a damn. So long as there is imported foods in the supermarket & their wages are getting paid, they are fine. This is how I feel about the majority of city people in Australia. Not all will be like this I grant you, but the majority obviously are.
    Keith.
     
  10. Prime

    Prime Active Member

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    I guess I'm just not one for prejudice.

    There are baby steps taken in many inner cities to grow what they can , where they can and how they can to minimize food miles , guerrilla farming , a reawakening of allotment and local small scale farming co-op basis. Yes clearly not on a massive scale but there IS interest there. Difficult in cities to make it work due to land shortages.

    Do many people in the country care ( the actual provenance ) where they get their milk? Their Meat? Their Veg and Fruit? Yes they may grow some but the whole scene is no so wrapped in safety tape its difficult to deal with the farmer directly. The Big shop at the Local Supermarket is still present. The market stall seems to be dying out everywhere .

    If we are going to talk Pollutants being entered into the environment how should we view the Farmers ( Big Ag or Small Ag ) that use a variety of non-healthy fertilisers on their fields to bolster growth? Are they now the saint? the sinner? or the commercially manipulated puppets.
     
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  11. Keith

    Keith Active Member

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    Obviously life here is different to where you live Prime, but yes I agree with your comment on some farmers using superphosphate. It gets into the dams & waterways & causes algae growth. This is not good, but farmers are becoming more aware here. Some farmers are far from blameless, but that still does not change the fact that farmers here are under attack from the government, & the majority of people are doing nothing. Mining is prioritised over farming here, fracking & mining for coal takes precedent & the farmers can not stop this on their own.
    Keith.
     
  12. Brownbear

    Brownbear Active Member

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    I think this is the core of the issue. So many 'country' people are now imports that much of the traditional skillset of country people has been significantly eroded by people that have not grown up learning the old ways without even knowing it. I struggle with the prejudice against town/city folk and I am uncomfortable with the idea that somehow they lack validity because that was where they were born (or had to move to). In real life folks have little real choice where they live - that is governed by employment and money. I also fundamentally disagree with the outright dismissal of those people as somehow uneducated, and also, that they will be the victims come a pandemic etc because they might not be - I cannot see into the future and, as far as I know, no can anyone else (with any reliability) so for a general assumption to exist that suggests that those in the country will be laughing at those in towns as they all perish is not only naïve but is actively closing the door to those people and those who may wish to prep and view the world that little bit differently. A bit of tolerance never went amiss.
     
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  13. lonewolf

    lonewolf Site Manager Staff Member

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    anything I say about city living is based on personal experience, I lived in a city for over 40 years after all.
    anything I say about people not knowing where their food comes from is based on personal experience, people I have met who don't know the difference between a goat and a calf for instance, people I know and have known who only have 3 days worth of food in the house at any one time- if you can even call it "food" that is.
    the "big shop" seems to be a thing of the past- we still do it once a month but most people seem to do it several times a week, some even do it daily.
    the thing that you have to remember about cities is that they are artificial, cities cannot survive alone, everything has to be shipped in from outside notably food and water, the acreage needed for food alone dictates no city could possibly feed its own people. so when the deliveries stop-for whatever reason- how will city people feed themselves? that is the question you have to ask yourself. apart from a few old boys on the allotments people are too busy to grow their own food, even if they have the skills and knowledge to do so and these get less and less as the population moves further away from its country roots and relies more and more on technology, technology that could fail in a crisis.
     
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  14. Keith

    Keith Active Member

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    Everyone has a different opinion, & there are some good comments from all in this discussion. There are cities & there are cities, & a lot of different people in those cities. As Brownbear says, we can not see the future, we can not tell what will happen. What city people may do in an all out crises situation we can not tell, their actions may pose a threat to country people, & it may not. We will have to wait & see & that may not happen in my life time.
    Keith.
     
  15. lonewolf

    lonewolf Site Manager Staff Member

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    we may not be able to see the future, just as well, who wants to see the moment of their own death? but given some of the comments that people make on "social media", FB and Twitter and the like, you can see how a lot would behave in adversity. not saying all would behave that way but a vast majority would, after all they would do the same as everybody else, its human nature.
    it dosent matter where people live, city or country, what we have to think about is how they will think and act in a crisis situation, will that affect our survival post event? I have always said its not necessarily the event that will kill you but the actions of others after the event.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2017
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  16. Prime

    Prime Active Member

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    Which is probably why in smaller communities its a good idea to come together and build relationships of a working structure BEFORE an event to build unity and cohesiveness to unable us to deal with such events.

    But we will all have a different view on that - i just don't see running off to a BOL as an individual in the course of an event where the larger community may benefit from someone with knowledge of studying crisis situations to remain and oversee awfully useful to solving the bigger problem.
     
  17. lonewolf

    lonewolf Site Manager Staff Member

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    Nice sentiment, in a modern society where normalcy bias rules and where most don't know their neighbours and are too busy with their own lives and jobs it probably wont happen. telling some we are a prepper will just tell them who to rob first post event, best to keep shtum and mind our own business and keep prepping quietly, remember OPSEC.
    my neighbours are okay, just okay, but in a crisis I want to be in control of my own destiny, not put my survival in the hands of someone that just happens to live next door or around the corner.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2017
  18. Prime

    Prime Active Member

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    You don't need to step forward and pronounce you're a 'prepper' and expect some sort of fan fare and red carpet treatment like you're superman rolling up.
    Its possible to get involved with your community on a small scale NOW and become a noted useful member of the community before the event - civil emergency group , scout leader , Neighbourhood watch - where one could offer small titbits of advice/help (even.... gahh! " Expertise " ) to people who may need it. And maybe they just need that advice in situations that arn't the full on Event X type scenario but smaller scale stuff.
     
  19. lonewolf

    lonewolf Site Manager Staff Member

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    I'm pretty sure that post event we may see people leaving the villages and smaller towns and moving to the cities, like what happened in the industrial revolution, only this time it wont be for jobs, it will be because they believe that the cities will get food and other resources first, which could of course be quite possible given that 80% of the UK population now lives in cities.
    no point in getting involved in the "community" if that community will be empty and abandoned post SHTF.
    just for the record there is no civil emergency group, scout troop or neighbourhood watch group where I live.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2017