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When Is It Too Late?

Discussion in 'Weapons' started by Keith, Nov 25, 2016.

  1. Keith

    Keith Moderator Staff Member

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    It is too late to acquire sufficient supplies, provisions & equipment as soon as shtf news reaches the public. Some people have the idea that when it all goes down, this is the best time for looting. WRONG! Everyone will be grabbing what they can, supermarket shelves will empty in minutes, not hours or days. This is a dangerous time to be accumulating what you think you need for your survival. This will be especially true for firearms.
    Depending on the level of warning, gun shop owners will either be closing shop, or they will be emptying the shop under armed guard.

    Now this brings me to another point. Personal & family defence. Many people dismiss the idea of bothering with a flintlock pistol, but what you have to seriously consider is, what are your other best options? Nothing compares with a hand gun which you can carry at the ready at all times. If you are able to own & keep at your home a modern sidearm, fine, but if not, surely a flintlock pistol is a better option than no sidearm at all.
    UK regulations allow you to own an antique muzzleloading pistol exempt from licensing & registration as far as I know. There may be area differences, so you will need to check on this. Being able to discharge a flintlock pistol may not be allowed, again, check regarding the area you live in. But the main thing is that come shtf, you will have protection in the form of a handgun & with no law & order you will be able to use it.
    Think about it.
    Keith.
    [​IMG]
     
    Darren and Brownbear like this.
  2. The Fat Chef

    The Fat Chef New Member

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    Good idea, must make sure though that the pistol is over 100 years old and legally classed as an antique.
    Quite a few of the flint lock pistols were converted to percussion cap which made them more reliable.
    The down side of this would be getting the caps and powders to make these work if you ever had to.
    Reputable gun shops will not sell these items without seeing a firearms certificate.
     
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  3. Darren

    Darren New Member

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    Hi, i was speaking to someone the other day about this. I'm not entirely sure but i believe that you still need a firearms licence, as it's still an active firearm. But i believe that you do not need to store it in a gun cabinet. My take on the discussion that i had was that you should use whatever you can get by with and acquire more as you go. Also it's useful to combine weapons and to become proficient with them, i.e knife, axe/tommohawlk, compound bow/cross bow.
     
  4. The Fat Chef

    The Fat Chef New Member

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    If the gun is a muzzle loader and over 100 years old you do not need a licence to possess.
    If you load it you will need firearms licence.
    Here lays the confusion possibly.
     
  5. lonewolf

    lonewolf Administrator Staff Member

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    I was under the impression if it could be fired it needed a FAC, if it couldn't be fired you don't.
     
  6. Brownbear

    Brownbear Active Member

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    There is a sort of halfway house I believe that allows for re-enactors and the like, still a license of sorts though. I remember my cousin having one for her Sealed Knot musket at one time
     
  7. The Fat Chef

    The Fat Chef New Member

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    If the gun is legally classed as an antique then it is an antique.
    It is only when you put the antique gun and powder together that it becomes a fire arm and needs a licence.
     
  8. lonewolf

    lonewolf Administrator Staff Member

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    that was probably a "black powder"licence.
     
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  9. lonewolf

    lonewolf Administrator Staff Member

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    antique or not, whether one intends to fire it or not, there have been prosecutions brought in the past for so called "ancient" weapons, it may be a grey area but best check with the police first before one assumes anything. better to be safe than sorry.
     
  10. The Fat Chef

    The Fat Chef New Member

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    As lone wolf says, grey area and my understanding is just my understanding.
    Always check with the law and get your own take on it.
    But I'm sure I'm right ;)
     
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  11. Brownbear

    Brownbear Active Member

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    It may well have been - it was a few years back so the details are hazy at my age ;)
     
  12. The Fat Chef

    The Fat Chef New Member

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    You need a black powder licence if using black powder but you do not need a licence to purchase propellant powder.
     
  13. ystranc

    ystranc Well-Known Member

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    There is also a classification of cartridge loading firearms called "obsolete caliber"for which no licence is required since no ammunition is commercially available. Essentially they're similar to deactivated firearms, bought and sold as decorative items.
    To own a serviceable black powder/muzzle loading pistol solely for the purpose of target shooting along with powder and shot in the UK requires membership of an approved gun club or enactment society instead of an FAC because they're classed as short firearms. Muzzle loading rifles for target shooting require a FAC.
    Just to clarify something that the Fat Chef mentioned, you can buy the components for self loading cartridges in any volume without a licence but you must have a licence in order to assemble them and you must never assemble more then you're entitled to hold at any one time, once assembled it is then illegal to disassemble them. You can own or possess shotgun shells containing 5 or more shot without a licence but you must have a shotgun licence in order to buy them.
     
  14. Keith

    Keith Moderator Staff Member

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    Make your own gunpowder.
    Keith.
     
  15. ystranc

    ystranc Well-Known Member

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    *sorry, should have read as well as a class 1 FAC